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Staffordshire (England)

Traditional English County

Last modified: 2021-02-20 by rob raeside
Keywords: staffordshire | kidsgrove | biddulph | sedgley |
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[Flag of Staffordshire] image by Jason Saber, 28 March 2016

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See also:


Introduction: Staffordshire

Staffordshire is a landlocked county in the West Midlands. It borders Cheshire, Derbyshire, Warwickshire, West Midlands County, Worcestershire, and Shropshire. Staffordshire is divided into nine districts. They are: Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire Moorlands, Stafford, East Staffordshire, South Staffordshire, Cannock Chase, Lichfield, Tamworth, and the City of Stoke-on-Trent. The largest settlement in Staffordshire is Stoke-on-Trent, which is administered as an independent unitary authority, separately from the rest of the county.
Other settlements include Burton upon Trent, Rugeley, Leek, and the smaller towns of Stone, Cheadle, Uttoxeter, Hednesford, Brewood, Burntwood/Chasetown, Kidsgrove, Eccleshall, Biddulph, Penkridge dot the landscape, as well as the villages of Wombourne, Kinver, Tutbury, Alrewas, Barton-under-Needwood, Stretton and Abbots Bromley. The Cannock Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) and parts of the National Forest and the Peak District national park.
Historically, Staffordshire dates back to Saxon times and was once divided into five hundreds: Cuttlestone, Offlow, Pirehill, Seisdon, and Totmonslow. Its historic boundaries cover much of what is now the metropolitan county of West Midlands. Wolverhampton, Walsall, West Bromwich and Smethwick are within those historic county boundaries, but since 1974 have been part of West Midlands county. Over the years the boundaries with their associated communities have been moved back and forth between the neighbouring counties in a confusing and patchwork fashion.
Of historical interest, in 2009, the largest hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found in Britain was discovered in a field near Lichfield. The artifacts, known as The Staffordshire Hoard, have been dated to the 7th century and the ancient Kingdom of Mercia.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Description of Staffordshire County Flags

The county of Staffordshire has acquired a new flag following a poll conducted by the Flag Institute to select one of two designs. The winning design, submitted by the Staffordshire Heritage Group, is a traditional county pattern, associated with Staffordshire for several centuries and includes the famed "Stafford Knot" which has been discovered on the treasure hoard found in the county in 2009 and dating from the seventh or eighth century. The winning design achieved 72.84% of the vote. The other design in the poll was the banner of arms of Staffordshire County Council.
Jason Saber, 28 March 2016

The gold background and red chevron comes from the coat-of-arms of the de Stafford family and has been used in connection with the county since at least the 17th century. The knot is an ancient symbol of Staffordshire, used by many organizations, including the Staffordshire Regiment and Staffordshire Cricket.

  • Flag Type: County Flag
  • Flag Date: 28th March 2016
  • Flag Designer: Traditional Design
  • Adoption Route: Popular Vote
  • UK Design Code: UNKG7455
  • Aspect Ratio: 3:5
  • Pantone® Colours: Yellow 116, Red 186
Source: The Flag Institute: Staffordshire.
Valentin Poposki, 1 July 2020


Proposed Staffordshire Flag
Staffordshire Knot Flag

[Proposed Staffordshire Flag] image by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

The Staffordshire knot is a three-looped knot that is the traditional symbol of Staffordshire and of the county seat (county town) of Stafford. Examples of the knot are found in the Anglo-Saxon artifacts of the Staffordshire hoard and the carvings on the 4-foot-high cross in the Stoke-upon-Trent churchyard.
This proposed Staffordshire knot variant flag for the county was a strong contender in the search for a county flag and is still popular with many residents of the county.
Source: British County Flags: Staffordshire
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire Banner of Arms
Staffordshire County Council Flag

[Staffordshire Banner of Arms] image by Dirk Schoenberger, 28 August 2009

From an article from the Litchfield blog:

"Litchfield Rural East's county councillor has launched a campaign to give a new pride of place to people who live in Staffordshire. Matthew Ellis, who retained his county seat with a landslide win in June, says that a sense of belonging is important in tackling some of the social issues the whole country is facing. He explained, "I'm always taken aback by the sense of belonging people feel in Cornwall. They are openly proud of their county, the food that's produced there and the culture which is so incredibly strong. Everywhere, it's Cornish this and Cornish that and you can't travel far without seeing Cornwall's black and white flag flying." And he believes that starting to fly Staffordshire's official flag is a good way to encourage people to feel part of their county.

Cllr Ellis has kicked the campaign off by buying a five foot Staffordshire flag for each of the thirteen parishes he represents. He added "Staffordshire has a long and fascinating history. We should be proud of that and reject efforts nationally to make us all feel part of the West Midlands Region. I don't know where that starts or finishes and, frankly, I don't want to. I do feel part of Staffordshire but don't feel part of some artificial administrative region. It may seem a small thing but if we can share a common cause and identity I think that could be very positive for the future."

Most public buildings in Staffordshire now fly the Union Flag permanently as a result of a County motion put forward last year by Cllr Ellis."

Jason Saber, 25 August 2009

We seem to be dealing with two distinct flags, a banner of the county arms and a plain green field with the full achievement. The first is automatic on the grant of arms, the second is official for the council. The banner of arms is the property of the rights-holder. Technically only the rights-holder may use it.
The second is the official flag of the council. Only those buildings, sites and vehicles belonging to the council may use it. That is the usual official position. None of this prevents the council from according the right to use either flag to any person or organisation. If the right has been granted, the person or organisation is free to use the flag within whatever limitations may have been specified.
Michael Faul, 27 August 2009

I just received an e-mail back from Cllr. Ellis regarding Staffordshire's flag. As a member of the Flag Institute I commented to him about what Hertfordshire did last fall by declaring their armorial banner the county flag and registering it with FI's registry. Thanks to my suggestion, he and the council are planning to do just that, registering Staffordshire's flag with FI therefore making it one of England's official county flags. (As to when this will happen, who knows...)
Brian Ellis, 27 August 2009

Staffordshire Banner of Arms - Manufacturer's Variant

[Staffordshire Council variant] Image from Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021
Based on this photo.

A manufacturer's variant of the Staffordshire County Council Flag with a darker navy blue background to the lion has been available and used. It is not officially recognized.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire County Council Flag
Green Field with the Full Achievement

[Flag of Staffordshire Council] Image from Adrian Thomas, 16 March 2003

On a green field, the coat of arms of the county (an enlarged version can be seen below): "...on the chevron gules a Staffordshire Knot of the first on a chief azure a lion passant guardant of the field and for the crest issuant out of a mural crown proper a Stafford knot or as same are in the margin hereof more plainly depicted. And by the authority afore said I the said garter do these presents grant and assign the supporters following that is to say on the dexter side a lion reguardant gules crowned with a ducal coronet or and on the sinister side a Gryphon reguardant or as the same are also in the margin hereof more plainly depicted the whole to be borne and used for hereafter by the Stafford county."
Adrian Thomas, 16 March 2003


Staffordshire County Council logos

[Staffordshire Council Council Logo]     [Staffordshire County Council Logos]    [Staffordshire County Council Logos]
images from Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

These are examples of the Staffordshire County Council logos in use on their website, their publications, posters and stationery.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire County Council Coat of Arms

[Staffordshire Coat of Arms - variant] Type #1    [Staffordshire Coat of Arms] Type #2    [Staffordshire Arms] Arms/shield
Type #1 located by Adrian Thomas, 16 March 2003 - Type #2 and Arms located by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

These arms were officially granted to the Staffordshire County Council in 1931. "All the devices on the arms come from arms of various Earls of Stafford. The red chevron on gold was the arms of the de Staffords. It is charged with the family's famous Stafford knot badge. The supporters are those of the de Staffords also, with the heads turned reguardant for heraldic difference."

Official Blazon

  • Arms: Or on a Chevron Gules a Stafford Knot of the first on a Chief Azure a Lion passant guardant of the field.
  • Crest: Issuant out of a Mural Crown proper a Stafford Knot Or.
  • Supporters: On the dexter side a Lion reguardant Gules crowned with a Ducal Coronet Or and on the sinister side a Gryphon reguardant Or.
  • Motto: The Knot Unites
Source: Heraldry of the World: Staffordshire.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire Police
Staffordshire County and Stoke-on-Trent Constabulary

[Staffordshire Police Flag] SP Flag      [Staffordshire Police Badge] Badge
images by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

In 1969 the Staffordshire County and Stoke-on-Trent Constabulary was established by combining two local police forces. Today, renamed simply the Staffordshire Police, they are the territorial police force still responsible for policing Staffordshire and unitary authority of Stoke-on-Trent. The force divided into eleven local police commands whose boundaries match the nine local authorities within Staffordshire.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

Staffordshire Police Logos

[Staffordshire Police Logos]       [Staffordshire Police Commissioner Logo] Staffordshire Police Commissioner
images by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

Both the Staffordshire Police and the Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service are under the command of the Staffordshire Commissioner for Police, Fire and Rescue and Crime, now headquartered in the joint "Fire and Police Hanley" operational building.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service

[StaffordshireFire and Rescue Service Flag]      [Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service Badge]

Staffordshire has large areas of heathland, chaseland and forest which pose considerable risk of wildfires during the hot dry fire seasons. The Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service is responsible for fire protection, prevention, intervention and emergency rescue in the county of Staffordshire and the connected unitary authority of Stoke-on-Trent. The SFRS provides emergency response from 33 strategically located fire stations in the shire.
The flag image is based on typical FRS flags, and not yet verified.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

[Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service Logo] image located by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire University

[Staffordshire University Flag] University Flag      [Staffordshire Staffordshire University Logo} University Logo
images located by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

Staffordshire University, first opened in 1901 as the Central School of Science and Technology, in 1926 changed its name to North Staffordshire Technical College, then to North Staffordshire Polytechnic, and later simplified to Staffordshire Polytechnic. In 1992 it became Staffordshire University.
It has one main campus based in the city of Stoke-on-Trent and three other campuses; in Stafford, Lichfield and Shrewsbury. In 1988, the institution changed its name to Staffordshire Polytechnic. In 1992, it became Staffordshire University, one of the new universities based on former polytechnics.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

Staffordshire University Coat of Arms

[Staffordshire Staffordshire University] image located by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

The meaning of the Staffordshire University Coat of Arms is explained thusly on their website:

  • The crest: The owl perching on the pillar represents Athena, Goddess of Wisdom. The Stafford knot carved into the pillar is the traditional symbol of our home county: Staffordshire.
  • Helmet and mantling: The colours of red and white are derived from the Stoke-on-Trent Coat of Arms.
  • The shield: The inverted "Y" shape is a symbol of the historic institutions that have formed together to create Staffordshire University. The open book represents knowledge, learning and education. The Stafford knot on the shield is the traditional symbol of our home county: Staffordshire.
  • Supporters: The swallows on either side of the shield represents the knowledge and students that Staffordshire University welcomes from all over the world.
  • The motto: Sapere Aude literally translates as "dare to know", representing our University value of being curious and daring.
Source: Staffordshire University: Our Heritage.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Diocese of Lichfield
Church of England

[Diocese of Lichfield, Staffordshire] Diocese Flag    [Diocese of Lichfield Arms, Staffordshire] Diocese Arms
images by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021
Based on this photo.

The town of Lichfield in Staffordshire is designated as a cathedral city with its beautiful Lichfield Cathedral, the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. The Diocese of Lichfield covers Staffordshire, much of Shropshire, and parts of the Black Country and West Midlands.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


East Staffordshire District Council
Flag, Arms and Logo

[East Staffordshire District Council] Flag and Logo   [East Staffordshire District Council Arms] Arms
images by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

East Staffordshire is a local government district with borough status in Staffordshire. It has two main towns: Burton upon Trent and Uttoxeter. Smaller villages in the East Staffordshire include Abbots Bromley, Tutbury, Barton-under-Needwood, Rolleston on Dove, Hanbury, Kingstone, Marchington, Mayfield and The Heath.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


South Staffordshire Council
Flag and Logo

[South Staffordshire Council]      [South Staffordshire Council logo]
images located by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

South Staffordshire is another local government district in Staffordshire. The district lies between the West Midlands county, Shropshire, and Worcestershire. It contains the towns of Penkridge, Brewood and Codsall and many smaller settlements that are considered commuter villages for Cannock, Stafford, Telford, and the West Midlands County.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


Staffordshire Moorlands District Council
Flag and Logos

[Staffordshire Moorlands District Council] image by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

Staffordshire Moorlands is a local government district of Staffordshire. Its council, Staffordshire Moorlands District Council, is based in Leek and is located between the city of Stoke-on-Trent and the Peak District National Park. Principal industries are agriculture, fashion and tourism. The area's three largest towns are Leek, Cheadle and Biddulph.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021

[Staffordshire Moorlands District Council Arms] Arms       [Staffordshire Moorlands District Council logo] Logo
images located by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021


North Staffordshire and South Staffordshire Regiments
These are Commercial Flags, not Official Regimental Colours

[North Staffordshire Regiment Flag - commerical] NSR    [South Staffordshire Regiment Flag - commerical] SSR
images by Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021
based on this image and this image.

The South Staffordshire Regiment was a line infantry regiment of the British Army that exist between 1881-1949. The regiment was created by combining the preexisting 38th (1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot and the 80th (Staffordshire Volunteers) Regiment of Foot. The South Staffordshire Regiment participated in the Second Boer War, World War I and World War II. After the Second World War it was reduced to a single Regular Army battalion, and in 1959 became part of the Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's).

The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's) was a line infantry regiment of the British Army between 1881 and 1959. It fought with distinction in World War I, World War II, the Second Sudanese War, the Second Boer War, the Anglo-Irish War and the Third Anglo-Afghan War. In 1959 it was merged with the South Staffordshire Regiment to become part of the Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's).

Today the Staffordshire Regiment is part of the Mercian Regiment (Cheshire, Worcesters, Foresters, and Staffords) and recruits from five of the counties that formed the ancient kingdom of Mercia.
Pete Loeser, 30 January 2021