This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Lithuania State Flag

Lietuva, Lietuvos Respublika, Republic of Lithuania

Last modified: 2017-09-29 by zoltán horváth
Keywords: lithuania | baltics | europe |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors




image by Randy Young, 02 April 2015


See also:


The revived state flag of Lithuania is the same as pre-war state flag. According to information received by the list the flag was re-introduced by a Law dated 1 September 2004, and differs from the its earlier version in that the reverse is now the same as the obverse
Christopher Southworth, 20 January 2004

Photo by Christian Westerback at "Helsingin Sanomat" (First published in print 8 April 2004; report by Kaius Niemi), show Lithuanian state flag used as jack.
Jan Mertens, 28 July 2007

Lithuania state historical flag (Lietuvos valstybes istorine veliava). Image scanned it from the "Heraldry of Lithuania" book.
On red field Vytis (the charge of National Arms). Flag proportions 3:5.
- this flag symbolizes the legacy of Grand Duchy of Lithuania,
- in the inter-war Lithuania there it was called the State Flag (when the tricolor was called the National Flag) and used as the presidential flag,
- in 2004 it was re-legislated in the Law of National Flag and called the Lithuania State Historical Flag,
- the law obliges flying this flag perpetually: on the Grand Ducal Palace in Vilnius, on the Trakai Castle and at the War Museum in Kaunas; also at some state institutions in particular days.
Virginijus Misiunas, 3 January 2010

I've seen several pictures where the Coat of arms of Lithuania is actually displayed on a red horizontal flag, as seen here and here. (Image1 and Image2)
Sources: http://www.truelithuania.com/double-masted-flags-a-new-type-of-monument-in-vilnius-4162
http://www.truelithuania.com/interwar-kaunas-to-be-styled-european-heritage-5300
Since I found no explanation on our Lithuanian pages (at first I thought it was a Presidential flag, but that was not the case, since what we have as Presidential flag is something else). Then I thought it might be a military flag, but again, what we have in military flags does not correspond with the flag I am reporting today.
So can anybody please help me find out what this flag is?
I've found some interesting bibliography on the coat of arms (http://www3.lrs.lt/pls/inter/w5_show?p_r=4056&p_d=9978&p_k=1 and http://www3.lrs.lt/pls/inter/w5_show?p_r=4056&p_d=17268&p_k=1) to start with, but any conclussive evidence might help in trying to find out what this flag is.
Esteban Rivera, 01 April 2015

This is Lithuanian state flag, used at a limited number of places and days, as specified by the National Flag Law.
Tomislav Todorović, 01 April 2015

I know we already have a graphic of the Lithuanian state flag, but I felt that the grey/silver horse and knight didn't match up with the photographs posted by Esteban, so I recreated the state flag with the horse and knight in white. I think this looks closer to the flags from the photographs.
Randy Young, 02 April 2015

I think this is how it is supposed to look.
Tomislav Todorović, 02 April 2015

The heraldic silver is indeed white in the flags, so that's a good match. I guess your image is a likely Vytis. However, the jack seems to be of the darker blue variety. So if you're making that one as well, you might use the darker shade there to show that Vytis doesn't always have the exact same colours. E.g.
http://defendinghistory.com/over-1000-neo-nazis-fill-main-vilnius-boulevard-on-lithuanian-independence-day/32439.
On eBay, BTW, Tatmingpoon2 sells his flags with an even bigger knight, but that's no guarantee original flags have that too.
Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 02 April 2015

For what this is worth, website of the Lithuanian president has the technical specifications. The drawings are from 2010. Most of his flags are printed images taken from Wikipedia, so if the Wikipedia image is wrong (and in this case, it was one that I did from government vectors of the arms), then this flag is wrong.
Zachary Harden, 02 April 2015