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US National Christian flag

Last modified: 2013-11-12 by rob raeside
Keywords: rimmer | eagle | cross | national christian flag |
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[United States National Christian flag] by Amanda Barnett Rimmer, 22 June 2004
See also:

The US National Christian Flag

There is a flag that was registered with the Library of Congress in 2003 as the US National Christian flag. It was recently unveiled via the Christian Broadcast Network on flag day. There is a website for your information: The flag was created by my mother, Marcia Thompson Eldreth.
Amanda Barnett Rimmer, 22 June 2004

The only sense in which the Library of Congress "registers" anything is through the U.S. Copyright Office, which is part of the Library of Congress organization. The only way the "flag" could be "registered" is by copyrighting its design. Maybe I'm reading more into Ms. Rimmer's message than I should, but she seems to intend her citation of the flag's "registration" with a U.S. government agency to give it some kind of official cachet. If so, she's being very misleading--it has none.
Joe McMillan, 23 June 2004

At least this [kind of flag] reduces claims which want to declare and collect the original Christian Flag as a solely national Christian flag, which has not been the aim of its creator.
Martin Karner, 23 June 2004

An article in 2005 states:

A U.S. Christian flag designed to united believers and underscore the Judeo-Christian foundation of the nation is gradually gaining popularity. Designed by a Christian artist, Marcia Thompson Eldreth of Cecil County, MD, the flag was inspired by a sermon she heard in church two years ago. Eldreth says she heard her pastor ask why more believers didn't fly the Christian flag, with the artist describes as "crisp and dignified, but politely cold." She sensed God was calling her to design a new flag for American Christians they could fly proudly along with Old Glory. The current international Christian Flag is a simple design: a white banner with a red cross on a dark blue canton in the upper left corner.  The symbolism of the new flag is as follows:
  • The eagle carrying the cross represents the American Christian taking the gospel around the world declaring Christ's shed blood for the people.
  • The Purple represents His royalty, the White represents His purity, the Red represents His shed blood, and the Blue represents His bruises.
  • The 50 stars that create the border of the flag represent all the Christians of the United States banding together to protect our right to preach the gospel and to protect our Christian heritage.
  • The Scriptures are Matthew 24:4, "Take heed no man deceive you," and Matthew 24:14 "And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world and then shall the end come."
This flag is evangelical and prophetic.

Robert Bullard, 14 June 2005

A blogger at points out the striking resemblance between this flag and the emblem of the National Rifle Association.
Ned Smith, 5 September 2009

Variants of the flag

[United States National Christian flag]      [United States National Christian flag] images by António Martins-Tuvàlkin, 5 September 2009

As for the flag design of this "US National Christian flag", analysis of actual flag images at shows that most flags include a white border outside the blue bordure (thus being not a heraldic bordure but an orle), even conceptually so, as the image shows.

This dark blue orle filled with white five-pointed regular upright stars, but surprisingly not in number of 50, even in idealized depictions, cf. with 50 stars, but (at page top) with 54.

This variation in the number of stars might be one of the differences between the original design and the "bolder design", as shown at shop page The latter shows the eagle slightly larger inside the disc, the tips of the scroll extending over the fuchsia ring.
António Martins-Tuvàlkin, 5 September 2009

Detail of emblem

[United States National Christian flag] image by António Martins-Tuvàlkin, 5 September 2009