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Club Nautique de Nice (Yacht Club, France): Members' private signals (1907)

Part 8: Regular members, S-W

Last modified: 2010-11-13 by ivan sache
Keywords: nice | private signal | crescent (yellow) | star (yellow) | swan (black) | dog (black) | crescent (white) | star (white) |
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CNN regular membership

According to Article 24 of the club's statutes, the admission into CNN of a regular member (aged at least 21) required introduction by two regular members and validation by two-third of the members of the Administrative Commission, in a vote by secret ballot.
According to Article 28, the admission fee was 20 francs; the yearly subscription was 10 francs, to which was added a 20 franc contribution to race organization. Active officers of the Army and the Navy did not pay the admission fee.
According to Article 5, regular members leaving the country for at least one year could ask for a leave, during which they would not pay any subscription; when back to France, their regular membership would be fully restored.

According to Article 7, a section of the CNN could be founded in a place where at leat five regular members stay. This happened in Saint- Raphaël (6 members).

According to Article 29, members were considered as non-resident when they lived in the Department of Alpes-Maritimes for less than six months (at the time, during the winter season).

The CNN 1907 Yearbook shows the private signal of the regular members detailed in the next sections.

Ivan Sache, 20 May 2010


Édouard Siegfried

[Siegfried's flag]

Siegfried's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Édouard Siegfried, admitted into the CNN in 1897 and the Corresponding member of the club for Saint-Rapha&eiml;l, is listed as the owner of the lugger Maï-Lou (0.5 ton). He won the CNN Cup in 1898 on the cutter Fifrelin and was defeated, on Maï-Lou, by Nicette in 1900. Siegfried's private signal is a blue triangular flag with a yellow border and a yellow crescent and star.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


J. Howard Taylor

[Taylor's flag]

Taylor's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

J. Howard Taylor, from London, admitted into the CNN in 1900, won a gold medal in the 1900 Olympic Games, held at Paris (3-10 tons, on Bona Fide). His signal is yellow with a black swan.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


Maurice Tranchant de Lunel

[Tranchant's flag]

Tranchant's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010

Maurice Tranchant de Lunel (1869-1944) was an architect and painter.
The son of a gold prospector, he added "de Lunel" to his family name; he studied at Eaton and Oxford, where he was a good friend of Rudyard Kipling. He graduated at the Académie des Beaux-Arts as an architect and at the Académie Jullian as a painter and watercolourist. Following his travels to Senegal and Guinea (1898-1899), he was commissioned to decorate the Senegalese pavillion at the International Exhibition of Paris (1900). Working as an architect in Nice from 1900-1905, he travelled to Persia and made a circumnavigation on his yacht Saint Alma.
After official missions to Indochina, India and Burma, Tranchant went to Morocco in May 1912, where he met the new French Resident, General Lyautey; Superintendant of Fine Arts and Historical Monuments from 1912 to 1924, Tranchant made a survey of the Moroccan historical monuments and restored many of them, for instance the gate of the Oudaya casbah at Rabat. Published in 1923, his book Maroc, au pays du paradoxe was prefaced by Claude Farrère, who published in 1923 Les hommes nouveaux, a fictionalized biography of Tranchant, portrayed as "Tolly", probably recalling that Tranchant signed most of his watercolours as "Talby", in Arabic, "student". The two writers shared a common passion for opium.
Back to France in the mid 1920s, Tranchant set up his painter's workshop on a barge moored in the Seine. He is considered as the last orientalist painter of the 20th century and an inspired follower of Delactroix.
Tranchant was one of the architects of the Great Mosque of Paris, built in 1922-1926 under the patronage of Lyautey.

Admitted into the CNN in 1902 and a member of the club's Administrative Committee in 1906, Tranchant de Lunel is listed as the owner of the motorboats Salve and Eagle (6.50 m, 5 hp). His private signal is horizontally divided red-blue-red with a blue vertical stripe placed along the hoist. Tranchant also sailed in partnership with Paul Chauchard.

Ivan Sache, 28 May 2010


Jules Valton

[Valton's flag]

Valton's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010

Jules Valton won a silver medal at the 1900 Olympics held at Paris (0.5-1 ton class, on Crabe II).
He is listed as a member of the CNN "on leave" and the owner of the oil-powered launch Muguette (6.50 m, 5 hp), of the cutter Laïs (91 tons) and of the sloop Paris (6 tons). In 1905, Valton, on Chocolat, won the CNN Cup, under the burgee of the Cercle de la Voile de Paris.

Valton's private signal is white with three red right-angled triangles placed along the hoist.

Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010


Henri Vincent

[Vincent's flag]

Vincent's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010

Henri Vincent, a ship builder from Cannes admitted into the CNN in 1896 and the Corresponding member of the club for Cannes, is listed as the owner of the oil-powered yacht Pierrot (6.50 m, 5 hp). His private signal is divided red-blue by the descending diagonal with, in the middle, a white rectangle charged with a black dog.

Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010


Charles Visquis

Charles Visquis, Director of the Société Générale bank and Vice Consul of Sweden, admitted into the CNN in 1902, is listed as the owner of the cutter Gascon (7 tons). His private signal is vertically divided in eight stripes in turn white and red, with a white canton covering one quarter of the flag and charged with a coat of arms.

Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010


Arthur Warrick

[Warrick's flag]

Warrick's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010

Arthur Warrick, from Grasse, is listed as a member of the CNN "on leave" and the owner of the cutter Why Not (ex Pourquoi-Pas ex Nirvana; 72 tons). His private signal is divided blue-red by three white diagonal, probably to represent the "AW" initials of the owner.

Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010


Carlo Wedekind

[Wedekind's flag]

Wedekind's private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010

Carlo Wedekind, an Italo-German banker admitted into the CNN in 1906, wintered in Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat in the luxurious Château Wedekind; built in 1899 in neo-gothic Venitian style, the villa was purchased in 1909 by the Hungarian princess Wilma Lwoff-Parlaghy and renamed Château Saint-Jean.
Wedekind's private signal is blue with a white star and crescent, the crescent pointing towards the hoist.

Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010


Jairus Edwin Withers

[Withers' flag]

Withers' private signal - Image by Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010

Jairus Edwin Withers (1843-1925), admitted into the CNN in 1897, was a master mariner from London. His private signal is red with a blue rectangle in the middle.

Ivan Sache, 29 May 2010