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Taber, Alberta (Canada)

Taber Municipal District

Last modified: 2017-06-04 by rob raeside
Keywords: alberta | taber | sun | cheveronel: 2 |
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[flag of Taber] image by António Martins-Tuválkin, 5 May 2017
Source: Taber town hall: http://www.taber.ca/index.aspx?NID=403


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Description of the flag

The Town of Taber web site shows a logo where the image is as shown, except the markings shown in green are in blue, representing sky and water. Additionally, the orange represents the sun, as Taber is said to enjoy "the longest sunlight in western Canada".

This logo appears to be based upon the town's grant of arms of 15 October 2004 in the Public Register of Arms, Flags & Badges of Canada. That entry consists of a grant of arms and a badge of the Taber Police Service, but no flag. There is, as yet, no symbolism given in the Public Register for these elements, but there is a blazon.

The website at http://www.taber.ca/explore_TABER/faqs.asp adds "Taber's diversity is evident through the different interpretations of shape. This icon represents many aspects of Taber such as: Irrigation, Oil, Agriculture, a growing community and the town spirit. The blue represents the abundance of water and also the big blue sky over the Town of Taber. The orange represents the long sun that shines over the town. Taber has the longest sunlight in western Canada."

Sources:
(1) Town of Taber web site, <http://www.taber.ca/explore_TABER/logo.asp>, (18 April 2006)
(2) The Canadian Heraldic Authority, The Public Register of Arms, Flags and Badges of Canada, <http://archive.gg.ca/heraldry/pub-reg/project-pic.asp?lang=e&ProjectID=485&ProjectElementID=1627> (18 April 2006)
Colin Dobson, 18 April 2006


The arms employ "two chevronels reversed couped embowed and conjoined in apex Vert", which forms the two green V shapes. Without evidence of the age of the logo, my guess is that the arms are based on the logo, and this complex description is a heraldic way of blazoning the logo. Ottawa ON, and Delta BC are two more examples of turning a graphic logo into an heraldic charge.

It is interesting to me that the logo is used on the flag with no lettering; it just seems like the sort of graphic logo that you see with the name of the town spelt out below. As to the green or blue colouring, perhaps someone can contact the town. The graphic logo is supposed to be blue, but the shapes on the arms are green.

According to the town's history, the area was once known by the rather unromantic "Tank No. 77", and was named "Tabor" (after Mount Tabor in Israel) by Mormon settlers who arrived from the US around 1903 (the town website acknowledges there is more than one possible source for the name, but this is the official one). The town was founded in 1907, by which time the spelling was fixed as it is now.
Dean McGee, 18 April 2006

The logo inspired the official coat of arms as indicated in the city’s official website at http://www.taber.ca/index.aspx?NID=403, where the text and images of Letters Patent of the Arms of the Town of Taber are copied. According to this armorial grant, the flag (a banner of the arms) should be square, yellow with the green element of the logo at the same location but the sun disc in red and added with flaming rays, and with a barrulet wavy (also red) between them.
António Martins-Tuválkin, 5 May 2017